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FAQ

Negotiations

The broker can negotiate with more than one candidate at the same time. He must, however, make this known to the parties involved.

The seller decides what he sells his home for in consultation with his estate agent. The buyer can negotiate the price, but the seller will make the final decision. This applies to all matters that the seller considers important to decide on whether he wants to sell his home to this buyer. If the seller and the buyer agree on these matters, it will result in a sale.

Sometimes the seller and the buyer decide not to negotiate on a number of minor matters, such as 'movable property', until they agree on the main issues. In such a case, a court may decide that if the parties cannot agree on the side issues, now that they agree on the main issues, that they themselves have indicated, they must continue to negotiate until a reasonable result has been achieved with regard to the side issues.

You cannot force yourself to be in the process of negotiation. You are only negotiating when the seller responds to your bid. In other words: if the seller makes a counter-bid. The selling broker can also explicitly indicate that he is negotiating with you. You are not in negotiations if the selling broker indicates that he will discuss your offer with the seller.

Purchase

No. The Supreme Court has ruled in a judgment that the asking price of a house is an invitation to make an offer. If you offer the asking price from an advertisement or housing paper, you make an offer. The seller can then still decide whether or not to accept your bid or to have his estate agent make a counter-bid. He may even decide to increase the asking price during the negotiations.

If the broker indicates that he is 'under offer', this means that he has a serious candidate, which he has promised not to promote transactions with others. However, this does not mean that viewings can no longer take place. The broker must then clearly indicate that he is 'under offer'.

Costs buyer ("kosten koper" (k.k.)) means that the buyer bears the costs for the transfer of the house. The costs buyer is about 10% of the purchase price. The costs buyer include the following costs:

- Transfer tax;
- Notary fees for the drawing up of the act of delivery;
- Land registry costs for registration of the act of delivery.

In addition to these costs, the buyer must also take into account: - Notary fees for the preparation of the mortgage deed;

- Land registry costs for registration of the mortgage deed.

The 'costs buyer' never include the brokerage costs. If a seller hires a real estate agent for the sale of his/her property then the seller will have to pay the costs of this agent. If the buyer hires a real estate agent for the purchase of a property, the buyer will have to pay the costs of this agent.

During the cooling-off period, the buyer can still cancel the agreement. This provides a time and opportunity to consult experts, for example.

The cooling-off period lasts (at least) three days and starts on the day following the day on which the buyer receives the signed act (by both parties) or a copy thereof. The cooling-off period ends at midnight on the last day of the cooling-off period. It is therefore irrelevant at what time the buyer received the copy of the act.,/p>

Sale

No. The costs for buyer never includes the brokerage costs. If you hire us for the sale of your property, you will have to pay for the costs of our services. If the buyer engages a real estate agent for the purchase of a home, the buyer will have to pay the costs of these services.

An option in a legal sense gives a party the choice to conclude a purchase agreement with another party by means of a unilateral declaration. The parties may agree on the condition of the purchase, but the buyer will, for example, be given another week in which to reflect on it.

Such an option is still customary when buying a new home. When buying an existing house, the term 'option' is often used incorrectly. Then it has the meaning of certain promises that a selling real estate agent can make to an interested buyer during the negotiation process. Such an undertaking may, for example, mean that an interested buyer is given a few days to think about a bid. In the meantime, the broker will try not to enter into negotiations with another party. The interested buyer can use this time to gain a better insight into his financial position or into the possibilities of using the house.

You cannot demand an option; the seller and the selling real estate agent decide for themselves whether certain promises will be made in a negotiation process.

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